Actually, Size Really Doesn’t Matter

Bass Player Magazine listed the acoustic uBass in an online roundup of short scale basses.

Bass Player Magazine listed the acoustic uBass in an online roundup of short scale basses.

 

And the uBass is proof.

In an online roundup of short scale basses headlined “Size Matters: A Roundup of Short-Scale Basses,” Bass Player magazine mentioned the Kala uBass. Not surprising since the magazine has been a fan of the little guy from the beginning. But what is surprising is that the magazine added the uBass in with the likes of a $9,000 Alembic Stanley Clarke Standard 4 bass, a $4,800 Callowhill OBS bass and a $2,000 Birdsong Corto2 bass.

Now that’s pretty good company to be in.

Here’s a taste of what they had to say about the acoustic Mahogany uBass:

While the U-Bass is nothing like the other instruments listed here, it certainly offers a short scale and, most important, sounds just as capable as much more traditionally designed basses. Most every person that’s picked up a U-Bass remarks at the incongruity between the instrument’s big sound and tiny size.

They’re absolutely correct about the uBass. It’s nothing like the others: it’s the shortest scale, it’s acoustic, it uses polyurethane strings, it’s at the bottom of the price scale and it sounds the most like an upright of all of them.

Not to mention, the little uBass can hold its own pretty well among the other basses listed.

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